BC Clean Energy (IPP) Guidebook 2011 Version

In the Draft Integrated Resource Plan released this week, BC Hydro forecasts that "BC's electricity demand is expected to increase by about 50% over the next 20 years."  That is not a small amount. And based on the recommended actions contained in the Draft IRP, it is logical to assume that this increased demand will be supplied, in part, by the development of new clean and renewable energy projects in British Columbia (wind, hydro, biomass, ocean, geothermal and solar). 

So for those looking to undertake the development of clean energy projects in British Columbia, here a link to the new 2011 updated British Columbia Clean Energy Guidebook [pdf] prepared by the BC Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations specifically for clean energy project proponents in the Province. 

The Guidebook provides excellent information on a variety of key project development matters including: 

  • Where to begin?
  • Permitting
  • Preparing a Development Plan
  • Hydro Power
  • Wind Power
  • Other Power (Bioenergy, ocean and geothermal)
  • Environmental Assessment
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • First Nations Consultation
  • Transmission Interconnection

You will also find some important Q & A's on the Ministry's website.

BC Hydro Draft Integrated Resource Plan

Today, BC Hydro released the much anticipated draft Integrated Resource Plan - 2012 (IRP) (Executive Summary and draft IRP Discussion Guide) which is a long-term forecast on supply and demand for electricity in British Columbia.  Essentially, the IRP is to expected to be used as a key document for long-term electricity planning in the Province.

The draft report contains 14 recommended actions and is released to the public today for consultation until July 6, 2012. Then, sometime before December 2012, BC Hydro will submit the final IRP for approval by the BC Cabinet. People are invited to have a say at an IRP consultation event hosted by BC Hydro.

As expected, the draft IRP is long on measures to encourage energy conservation and efficiency but also includes a few recommendations for much needed infrastructure capital investment for both capacity (Revelstoke Dam upgrade) and transmission (Prince George to Terrace upgrade) purposes. The $7.9 Billion Site C Dam is proposed to move ahead with an expected online date of 2020. In the meantimne, the spot electricity market, the Canadian Entitlement and Burrard Thermal are recommended to used as energy supply gap fillers. 

For the BC renewable energy sector, the most noteworthy draft recommendation is:  

RECOMMENDED ACTION #8: Develop energy procurement options to acquire up to 2,000 gigawatt hours per year from clean energy producers for projects that would come into service in the 2016-2018 time period.

The prospect of new BC power calls is of course welcome news to the sector, but there is caution: (a) this is a draft IRP only; and (b) the draft IRP notes that any new electricity procurement decisions would made only when there is more certainty of the demand.  Most of the new power is expected from wind, run-of-river and biomass project as these are proven to be the lowest-cost options, but geothermal and ocean technologies may also be considered. The objective in the BC Clean Energy Act that the Province "generate 93% from clean or renewable sources" effectively prohibits new power from natural gas facilities, which is good news from a greenhouse gas emissions standpoint.

Much of the long term electricity load is contingent on the development of the proposed LNG export projects on BC's Northwest coast. If the LNG export facilities are built, the demand for electricity in the Province could exceed 25% of the existing BC Hydro load (based on an estimated 4 LNG plants at approximate use of 4,000 GWh/year each. For context, the current BC Hydro load is approximately 60,000 GWh/year). Decisions on the LNG export projects are still under consideration by the proponents, with some decisions expected before the end of the year.  

With bi-partisan political and First Nations support for the proposed LNG export projects, the British Columbia Government's $20 billion BC LNG Energy Strategy may yet be realized. And if so, be certain that it will be all hands on deck in British Columbia for the next few years to support this significant new energy intesive economic opportunity.

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British Columbia Introduces Clean Energy Act

Today, the British Columbia government introduced the much anticipated Clean Energy Act into the BC Legislature.

Here is a copy of the first reading of the Act (Bill 17) and here is the government's press release on the annoucement.

Finally, it is worth to check out the government's website for the Clean Energy Act which contains some good background information on the Province's new clean energy plan.

More analysis to come....still need to digest all of this.

It was also great to see the government release a report on the Green Energy Advisory Task Force. It was a pleasure to be a part of this group and happy to see many of the Task Force recommendations now forming part of the new Clean Energy Act. Here is a copy of the full Green Energy Advisory Task Force report.

BC's 2010 Throne Speech - Untapping BC's Clean Energy Potential

Today, the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia delivered the Speech from the Throne (click to read), which opened the Second Session of the 39th Parliament of British Columbia.  

The 2010 Olympics and the economy were principal topics of course, but the BC government's commitment to revamping the Province's clean energy industry also featured prominently. Below are some of the highlights from the Speech relevant to the clean energy sector:

  • The BC government will take a fresh look at B.C.'s regulatory regimes, including the BC Utilities Commission.
  • BC can harness [BC's untapped energy] potential to generate new wealth and new jobs in its communities while it lower greenhouse gas emissions within and beyond our borders.
  • Clean energy is a cornerstone of BC's Climate Action Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by one‑third by 2020.
  • Building on the contributions of the Green Energy Advisory Task Force, the BC government will launch a comprehensive strategy to put BC at the forefront of clean energy development.
  • BC has enormous potential in bioenergy, run‑of‑river, wind, geothermal, tidal, wave and solar energy. We will put it to work for our economy.
  • The BC government will introduce a new Clean Energy Act to encourage new investments in independent power production while also strengthening BC Hydro.
    • It will provide for fair, predictable, clean power calls.
    • It will feature simplified procurement protocols and new measures to encourage investment and the jobs that flow with it.
  • New investment partnerships in infrastructure that encourage and enable clean modes of transportation, such as electric vehicles, hydrogen‑powered vehicles and vehicles powered by compressed natural gas and liquid natural gas, will be pursued.
  • The BC government will support new jobs and private sector investment in wood pellet plants, cellulosic ethanol production, biomass gasification technologies and fuel cell technologies.
  • Bioenergy creates new uses for waste wood and beetle‑killed forests and new jobs for forest workers.
  • A new receiving license will give bioenergy producers new certainty of fiber supply, while a new stand‑as‑a‑whole pricing system will encourage utilization of logging residues and low‑grade material that was previously burned or left on the forest floor.
  • The BC government will optimize existing generation facilities and report on the Site C review this spring.
    • It will develop and capture B.C.'s unique capability to firm and shape the intermittent power supply that characterizes new sources of clean energy to deliver reliable, competitively‑priced, clean power — where and when it is needed most.
  • New conservation measures, smart meters and in‑home displays will help maximize energy savings. New smart grid investments and net metering will provide more choices and opportunities for reduced energy costs and more productive use of electricity.
  • New transmission investments will open up the Highway 37 corridor to new mines and clean power.
  • New transmission infrastructure will link Northeastern B.C. to our integrated grid, provide clean power to the energy industry and open up new capacity for clean power exports to Alberta, Saskatchewan and south of the border.
  • We will seek major transmission upgrades with utilities in California and elsewhere.
  • If the Province act with clear vision and concerted effort now, in 2030, people will look back to this decade as we look to the 1960s today.

With significant investment in green energy being made elsewhere, both in Canada and the US,  we hope that today's Speech from the Throne demonstrates the BC government's commitment to building the Provincial economy in part with the support of the clean energy sector.

BC's Green Energy Advisory Task Force

Following up on the BC Government's August 2009 throne speech and the Premier's announcement on November 2, 2009, today, the BC Government announced the members of, and the terms of reference for, BC's Green Energy Advisory Task Force. 

 
Here is the weblink for public submissions, which can be made on any of the four task force topics until December 31.
 
I am very pleased to have been appointed to be a part of a team that will advance BC's long-term vision for green energy.
 
Reporting directly to the Cabinet Committee on Climate Action and Clean Energy, the Green Energy Advisory Task Force will comprise of the following 4 advisory task force groups:
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Procurement and Regulatory Reform
    This task force will recommend improvements to BC Hydro’s procurement and regulatory regimes to enhance clarity, certainty and competitiveness in promoting clean and cost-effective power generation; and identify possible improvements to future clean power calls and procurement processes.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Carbon Pricing, Trading and Export Market Development
    This task force will develop recommendations to advance British Columbia’s interests in any future national or international cap and trade system, and to maximize the value of B.C.’s green-energy attributes in all power generated and distributed within and beyond B.C. borders. The task force will also develop recommendations on carbon-pricing policies and how to integrate these policies with any cap and trade system developed for B.C.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Community Engagement and First Nations Partnerships
    This task force will develop recommendations to ensure that First Nations and communities see clear benefits from the development of clean and renewable electricity and have a clear opportunity for input in project development in their areas. It will work in partnership with First Nations, not only to respect their constitutional right, but to open up new opportunities for job creation and reflect the best practices in environmental protection.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Resource Development
    This task force will identify impediments to and best practices for planning and permitting new clean, renewable-electricity generation to ensure that development happens in an environmentally sustainable way. The task force will also consider allocation of forest fibre to support energy development and invite input from solar, tidal, wave and other clean energy sectors to develop strategies to enhance their competitiveness.
BC has tremendous green energy potential and we are pleased that the government is taking steps that will help turn British Columbia's energy potential into real economic, environmental and social benefits for all British Columbians.

Canadian Geothermal Energy Industry A Global Player

Last week's sold out geothermal energy workshop in Toronto organized by CanGEA brought national attention to the Canadian geothermal energy sector. Gary Thompson, President of Sierra Geothermal Power Corp. and Ross Beaty, Chairman and CEO of Magma Energy Corp., both Vancouver based companies, were interviewed in Toronto on the Business News Network and discussed the global opportunities presented by geothermal energy. Here is the video link for the very interesting discussion.

In addition, the Globe and Mail reported that recent financings and significant US government incentives are fuelling increased interest in the global geothermal energy industry. In Canada, unlike in the United States and around the world however, utility grade geothermal energy projects do not yet exist despite excellent resources and a willing industry.  The development of geothermal energy in British Columbia and Canada is challenged in part by the existing regulatory framework and the complex permitting process.  With continued attention to this clean and green base load energy source, the Canadian geothermal energy industry hopes to overcome present barriers and create a strong geothermal industry in this country.

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BC Throne Speech - A Major Boost For Green Energy

Today, the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia delivered the Speech from the Throne (click to read) to open the 2009 Legislative Session: 1st Session, 39th Parliament of the BC Legislature.

For BC's renewable energy sector which has been looking for a new commitment from the BC Government, the Throne Speech was most definitely that.

Here are the specific renewable energy highlights direct from the Speech: 

·         Green energy will be a cornerstone of British Columbia's climate action plan.

·         Electricity self-sufficiency and clean, renewable power generation will be integral to our effort to fight global warming.

·         The BC Utilities Commission will receive specific direction.

·         Phasing out Burrard Thermal is a critical component of B.C.'s greenhouse gas reduction strategy.

·         Further, this government will capitalize on the world's desire and need for clean energy, for the benefit of all British Columbians.

·         Whether it is the development of Site C, run-of-river hydro power, wind, tidal, solar, geothermal, or bioenergy and biomassBritish Columbia will take every step necessary to become a clean energy powerhouse, as indicated in the BC Energy Plan.

·         Government will use the means at its disposal to maximize our province's potential for the good of our workers, our communities, our province and the planet.

·         While these forms of power require greater investment, in the long run, they will produce exponentially higher economic returns to our province, environmental benefits to our planet and jobs throughout British Columbia.

·         High-quality, reliable, clean power is an enormous economic advantage that will benefit every British Columbian in every part of this province for generations to come.

·         Ready access to clean, affordable power has been a huge strategic incentive to industrial development in British Columbia.

·         We will build on past successes with new strategies aimed at developing new clean, renewable power as a competitive advantage to stimulate new investment, industry and employment.

·         Growing knowledge industries like database management and telecommunications will increasingly look for new places to invest and create jobs that have clean, reliable, low-carbon, low-cost power.

·         New energy producers will be looking for long-term investments leveraged through long-term power contracts that give them a competitive edge in our province.

·         B.C.'s multiple sources of clean, renewable energy are far preferable to reliance on other dirtier forms of power.

·         We will open up that power potential with new vigour, new prescribed clean power calls and new investments in transmission. New approaches to power generation, transmission and taxation policies will create new high-paying jobs for British Columbia's families.

·         A new Green Energy Advisory Task Force will shortly be appointed to complement the work of the BCUC's long-term transmission requirement review.

·         That task force will be asked to recommend a blueprint for maximizing British Columbia's clean power potential, including a principled, economically-viable and environmentally-sustainable export development policy.

·         It will review the policies, incentives and impediments currently affecting B.C.'s green power potential, and it will identify best practices employed in other leading jurisdictions.

·         We will promote biomass power solutions and convert landfill waste into clean energy that reduces harmful methane gas emissions.

·         The government has mandated methane capture from landfills to ensure we deal responsibly with our own waste and convert it to clean energy where practicable.

Update: BCUC Section 5 Transmission Inquiry

Following up from our earlier blog post on the Section 5 Transmission Inquiry, after almost four months of workshops and procedural conferences, the BCUC continues to narrow the scope of the issues for the Inquiry. Stakeholder consultation is on-going and the two principal utility participants are holding workshops and inviting comments from participants on specific issues (BC Hydro on resource option potential and BCTC on its scenario development process and the export study) before September 18 when the first draft "evidence" is submitted by BC Hydro and BCTC.

Two weeks ago, after an uncomfortably long but ultimately productive oral hearing on the scope of issues for the Inquiry, the BCUC released its preliminary determinations on the scope and scale for the next steps in the long-term analysis of the transmission system. The issues addressed in the BCUC's July 10 letter on preliminary determinations focused mainly on the following issues

  • provincial generation potential
  • domestic electricity demand
  • interjurisdictional trade (import and export of electricity)
  • analysis of the transmission system
  • areas inappropriate for development
  • integration of generation, demand and transmission requirement
As you can see, the issues are very broad and the analysis at a very high-level.
 
Yesterday, over 200 participants attended a BC Hydro workshop in Vancouver on the Province's renewable energy resource option potentialBC Hydro's presentation included a series of renewable energy resource maps of the Province showing potential sites for run-of-river, large hydro and pumped storage, wind, geothermal, biomass, solar and, wave and tidal. BC Hydro also provided detailed maps on so-called "exclusion areas" (ie, legal no build zones) and potential regional power clusters. I found the maps to to be very very interesting, albeit not particularly site specific. If you interested in where the renewable energy potential is in British Columbia you have to check out these maps (I am told the materials will be available on the BC Hydro site sometime soon).  BC Hydro has asked that stakeholders provide it with confidential comments on BC Hydro's version of the Province's resource option potential by August 14. Stakeholders may also submit their own comments directly to the BCUC through the Inquiry process. 
 
There is also a significant First Nations element to the Inquiry. The first issue which the BCUC is addressing in this regard, is the duty to consult and accommodate First Nations in the context of the Inquiry. I won't at this time get into the complex legal issues on the subject, but a further procedural conference on First Nations issues is scheduled at the BCUC on August 18 and 19, 2009 and written submissions are now being made.

With over 105 registered participants, the Section 5 Transmission Inquiry is certainly one of the most followed hearings ever before the BCUC, and one of the more interesting, especially with respect to the future development of renewable energy resources in this Province.

Continue Reading...

In the news: Ski Resort Wind Turbine, US Climate Bill Passes House and a $100M Geothermal IPO

Lots of renewable energy news this past week. Here's what I find interesting:

1. Vancouver Wind Turbine: Grouse Mountain Ski Resort situated high above the City of Vancouver will soon be home to a single 1.5 MW wind turbine which will be used to provide the busy ski hill (and local hiking hotspot) with approximately 20% of its energy.  The 65 metre wind tower which be built at the very top of the mountain and be visible from places across the lower mainland, will also accept visitors who will be able to ride an elevator to a viewing area 58 metres up. Now that's very cool. Commercial operation is expected right around the time of the Olympics, in early 2010.  You can read more about the details in the Vancouver Sun's recent article and commentary.  Well done, Grouse Mountain on your green energy project. This will be a great chance for people to appreciate the opportunity in British Columbia to harness the wind for our electricity. 

2. US Climate Change Bill Passes:  The US Clean Energy Act (Waxman-Markey Bill) was approved by a House vote of 219-212. The current version of the bill would mandate that 15% of the US electricity come from renewable sources by 2020.  It also sets the framework for a cap and trade system with the goal of reducing overall US greenhouse gas emissions by 17% from 2005 levels by the year 202, and 83% by 2050. The potential impact of this legislation is monumental. However, before you get too excited about it, remember the bill now goes on to be voted on in the Senate, where anything and everything can happen. For some great commentary on the bill, check out Alan Durning's post on Sightline. As for Canada's climate bill? Well, sadly, there is nothing to report. Canada is waiting it out and will piggy back on the American climate bill.  Interesting policy.

3. Geothermal Energy Company IPO: Vancouver based, Magma Energy Corp. a geothermal energy company with operations in the United States and South America, this past week reportedly raised $100 million in an initial public offering of the company's shares, which are expected to begin trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange on July 7 (MXY.TO).  This is great news for the geothermal energy industry, which is truly one of the best renewable energy resources available on account of its reliability and base load capability but has always been under appreciated, until now perhaps. For more information on Canada's geothermal potential, check out CanGEA.  

FYI - You can now follow Megawatt on Twitter.

Free Money: Canada's Clean Energy Fund Program

So you would like some free money for your clean energy project demonstration? The Government of Canada through its recently announced Clean Energy Fund Program is now offering $850 million over five years for the demonstration of promising technologies, including large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects, and renewable energy and clean energy systems demonstration. An additional $150 million over 5 years is available for clean energy research and development.
 
You can read more about the Clean Energy Fund Program here and here, and the Request for Proposals (RFP) for funding.
 
For renewable and clean energy project demonstrations, $200 million of free Canadian dollars is available to those who meet certain eligibility criteria and have full project proposals submitted no later than end of business on September 14, 2009.  Note that the first step is to file with the federal government an "Intent to Submit Project Proposal".
 
Technologies eligible for funding include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Smart Grids
  • Plug-in Hybrid electric charging infrastructure
  • efficient systems which facilitate intermittent renewable power and heat
  • utility scale storage systems
  • heat pump with natural refrigerants and supply of renewable energy
  • efficient hybrid systems combining renewable or waste energy with limited fossil fuel input for remote communities
  • geothermal or waste heat sources upgraded for power and and heat for communities
  • wind energy technologies that address Canadian challenges (ie cold climate, remote communities, offshore application and grid integration)
  • marine energy
  • low head hydro
  • solar thermal and PV systems

The good news is that the Government of Canada has again recognized the importance of renewables and the need to meet the diverse demands of the country. The bad news is that there is a lot more money being diverted to cleaning up the pollution, rather than replacing the pollutters altogether.

Geothermal: Canada's Hottest Natural Energy Resource

Last week, along with approximately 150 others, I attended the first ever CanGEA Geothermal Energy Conference at the new convention centre in Vancouver. It was a tremendous three day event, consisting of a workshop and open house, an industry day and a technical program. By all indication, the geothermal industry is well served by CanGEA. 

Geothermal energy, not to be confused with its cousin geo-exchange, is capable of utility-scale generation of electricity.  What is unique (and great) about geothermal energy is that it is low-impact, base load (ie, non-intermittent), cost-effective and widely available. It really is the "greenest" of all renewable power.  About 10 GW of geothermal electric capacity is installed around the world as of 2007, generating 0.3% of global electricity demand. The US, Philippines and Indonesia are the global leaders in installed geothermal electric capacity.  And because of its geographic location on earth, British Columbia is home to some world class geothermal energy resources. 

While there are no geothermal facilities currently generating electricity in the province, I am aware of two BC publicly traded companies currently conducting geothermal exploration in British Columbia Western GeoPower has operations which are close to commercial viability at South Meager Creek (north of Pemberton). It is also developing a 35MW geothermal plant in the Geysers region of northern California.  Sierra Geothermal Power Corp. recently signed a memorandum of understanding with the Da'naxda'xw/Awaetlala Nation to develop geothermal power projects on their traditional lands, covering approximately 800,000 hectares (2 million acres) in the Knight Inlet area of British Columbia.

In my view, it is time that British Columbia and Canada (there are also good resources in the North) catch up to the rest of the world and put geothermal energy on the renewable energy to do list. The opportunities for this home based green energy natural resource are too good to pass up. Now is the time to move towards CanGEA's goal of 5,000 MW of installed geothermal energy resources by 2015. I truly believe with a little help, such as the federal government renewing the EcoEnergy for Renewable Power program, this can be done.

The BC Energy Plan: Report on Progress

Last week, the BC Government released a report on progress of its 2007 BC Energy Plan.  The report shows just how far the Province has come in a little over 2 years since the introduction of the BC Energy Plan and demonstrates the Province's environmental leadership and many initiatives in the clean energy sector.

Some of the renewable energy specific highlights in the report include:

The Province should be properly recognized for doing many of the right things to encourage the development of a green economy on many different fronts throughout British Columbia. While there is much work still to be done, the foundation has been laid and businesses have stepped up and invested millions of dollars, and created thousands of jobs as a result of the Energy Plan. So, yes, a green focused economy works very well for British Columbia.

Meanwhile...South of the Border: Introducing The American Clean Energy and Security Act

President Obama promised a commitment to green energy, and today, the United States Committee on Energy and Commerce delivered, through the introduction of new federal clean energy legislation that, according to the press release, "will create millions of clean energy jobs, put America on the path to energy independence, and cut global warming pollution."  

The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACESA) is still in the draft stage, but it certainly looks promising, and I must admit to a bit of envy of our American friends and their progressive legislators.  Here is the Discussion Draft Summary (click to download) which is definitely worth reading (all I can say is wow!).  The New York Times' Green Inc. blog weighs in on the reaction to the controversial legislation.

The ACESA will focus on four principle areas:

  1. Clean Energy: which includes renewable energy load requirements at 6% in 2012 and a whopping 25% in 2025, carbon capture and sequestration, clean fuels and vehicles, smart grid and electricity transmission.
  2. Energy Efficiency: which includes new building and appliance standards, energy rebates, new fuel and emissions standards, and national energy efficiency standards.
  3. Reducing Global Warming Pollution: which includes a market-based program of "allowances" and "offsets" for electric utilities, oil companies, large industrial sources and other entities (looks alot like cap and trade), steps to preventing international deforestation and the introduction of additional greenhouse gas standards.
  4. Transitioning to a Clean Energy Economy: which includes measures to ensure domestic competitiveness in the form of rebates for companies which produce commodities that are traded globally, the promotion of green jobs, consumer assistance, export of clean tech and a high level response to global warming.

In Canada, we can't even begin to compare our green energy legislation to the Americans, there is definitely nothing like the proposed ACESA, which is definitely too bad, but perhaps also a goal for our country's leaders.  For some recent Canadian context, the federal government has just invested $140M with the major oil companies for carbon-capture projects (ugh!). In addition, the feds have not renewed the very successful (and green economy stimulating) Canadian ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program

In all, it remain to be seen what will become of the surely to be ACESA, but judging by the broad reach of the proposed legislation, the Obama Administration means business when it comes to the green economy. One thing is abundantly clear - the United States sees clean energy, energy efficiency and fighting climate change as part of the new world order and critical to the future of America. This leadership is something Canadians should recognize and the smart ones will harness the momentum from south of the border and work to create our own carbon-reduced green energy economy.  The green energy technology revolution:  you can't stop it, you can only hope to contain it.

Facts on Independent Power Production in British Columbia

Yesterday, the British Columbia Government, Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, issued a press release entitled "Facts on Independent Power Production" (click to download a copy), to correct misleading claims about electricity generation in the Province. It's a must read for anyone who is interested in green energy in British Columbia.  

The comprehensive press release deals with many of the falsehoods being spread by opponents to independent power producers and specifically addresses, with facts, the following topics: 

  • What it means to BC to be "electricity self-sufficient"
  • BC Hydro's on-going role in the BC Energy Plan
  • Costs to ratepayers for long-term IPP energy purchase contracts
  • The non-privatization of BC Hydro
  • Local input and environmental review of IPP projects
  • BC rivers remaining in the public's control
  • The possible future export of power by IPP's
  • The export/import debate
  • The number of current water power applications and what these mean
  • The total number of IPP's operating in BC and the investment they have brought
  • First Nations support of IPP projects

This release is very good timing given the current political climate and the unfourtunate, mostly politically motivated, backlash against the IPP industry. Hopefully, the facts will help educate the public about IPP's and we can then move to a proper dialogue on how we as a Province can use our incredible natural endowment to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and reverse the damaging effects of climate change.  To do anything short of that would be a disgrace.

BC's February 2009 Throne Speech - The Green Energy Agenda

For our report on the August 26, 2009 Throne Speech (A Major Boost to Green Energy), click here.

The BC Government today delivered its Throne Speech, outlining its political agenda for the upcoming year, and you can't help but notice that an election is coming on May 12, 2009. 

It was no surprise, but energy was among the major topics addressed on in the speech calling it "another core competitive advantage for British Columbia".  The Government sees a green energy economy as a catalyst to creating rural jobs, reducing greenhouse gases and transforming forestry in the Province.  Apparently, green energy is central to the future economic success of our Province. Can't really disagree with that.

Below are some of the more interesting energy related quotes (see pages 21-27 of the Throne Speech): 

  • "Our government will build on its Clean Energy Plan with new direction to BC Hydro and to the British Columbia Utilities Commission."
  • "Independent power production will continue to create new jobs in rural communities."
  • "We will open up new opportunities for private investment to create jobs and meet our needs."
  • "We can become global leaders in wind, run-of river, tidal, geothermal, wave, solar and other forms of clean, renewable power and leading-edge transmission technologies."
  • "An integrated, expanded transmission plan that encourages small scale power projects, economic opportunity and jobs throughout B.C. will be set by year end."
  • "Energy opportunities will transform the future of forestry in British Columbia with clean, carbon-neutral bioenergy, fueled by biomass from beetle-killed forests."
  • "Our government will pursue a major expansion in transmission capacity that will create thousands of new construction jobs and reduce energy loss through transmission."
  • "The goal of a Northeast Transmission Line will be pursued."
  • "More work will be done this year to advance the dialogue on Site C to decide its merit."

It only gets more interesting from here. Tomorrow is budget day.

 

 

 

 

 

Generating Green Power and Jobs in BC: A video look at independent power production in British Columbia

For anyone who is curious about what the green power industry is doing in British Columbia, you need go no further.  Today, the Independent Power Producers Association of British Columbia (IPPBC) released a new video, entitled "Generating Green Power and Jobs in BC" which provides a unique look at the independent power production industry in BC. 

“The video contains ‘on location’ footage of run-of-river hydro, wind power, biomass, geothermal, and energy-recovery-generation projects around the province. It includes comments from ‘green collar’ IPP workers, mayors, First Nations project participants, energy expert Dr. Mark Jaccard and IPPBC Directors.” said Steve Davis, IPPBC President. 

You can view the very slick 10 minute IPPBC video by clicking here

I would guess that most people have never seen a biomass facility or run-of-river power plant, or even understood the complex process of making green energy, so I must commend IPPBC for undertaking the important but necessary task of educating the general public on the work of the IPP industry. 

In addition, for more information about independent power production in the Province, IPPBC has also prepared some excellent fact sheets on the following green energy topics (which we have included for your downloading pleasure):