BC Clean Energy (IPP) Guidebook 2011 Version

In the Draft Integrated Resource Plan released this week, BC Hydro forecasts that "BC's electricity demand is expected to increase by about 50% over the next 20 years."  That is not a small amount. And based on the recommended actions contained in the Draft IRP, it is logical to assume that this increased demand will be supplied, in part, by the development of new clean and renewable energy projects in British Columbia (wind, hydro, biomass, ocean, geothermal and solar). 

So for those looking to undertake the development of clean energy projects in British Columbia, here a link to the new 2011 updated British Columbia Clean Energy Guidebook [pdf] prepared by the BC Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations specifically for clean energy project proponents in the Province. 

The Guidebook provides excellent information on a variety of key project development matters including: 

  • Where to begin?
  • Permitting
  • Preparing a Development Plan
  • Hydro Power
  • Wind Power
  • Other Power (Bioenergy, ocean and geothermal)
  • Environmental Assessment
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • First Nations Consultation
  • Transmission Interconnection

You will also find some important Q & A's on the Ministry's website.

Site C - Adding Capacity to BC's Storage Advantage

Today, the Province of BC announced plans to build a 900 MW hydro-electric dam on the Peace River in northern BC, the project known as Site C. It will be a public project and its development is subject to permitting, and first nations and community consultation. Here is a link to the Vancouver Sun's story.

This is a bold but necessary move by a government looking to build more clean renewable power in the Province. Hydro-electric power is a reliable and preferred form of electricity generation in British Columbia with a great history. Premier W.A.C Bennett's hydro-electric vision in the 1960's helped the Province develop to what it is today. The incredible legacy dam system he provided now allows British Columbians to enjoy the fruits - inexpensive, domestically generated, clean electricity.

There are many reasons to build Site C but for the renewable energy industry in British Columbia, one of the most important aspects is the Province moving to increase its electricity storage capacity. 
 
The backbone of any electricity system is the ability to generate electricity at will, from its reserves. Electricity in its basic form (electrons) does not keep for very long. Fortunately, it can be stored in other forms. Commonly, it is coal or natural gas, but each of those has its own set of undesirable CO2 emission attributes. Due to some fortunate topography and the vision of Premier Bennett, British Columbia has considerable clean storage capacity located in its heritage dams.

In addition to providing enough electricity to power approximately 410,000 homes, Site C and its potential 900 MW of capacity will also be used for its storage capacity to support the massive development of new renewable power, such as wind, run-of-river hydro and solar . These renewable power sources are intermittent in nature and require additional resources to shape and make the power generated from those fuel sources more firm and acceptable to transmission grid operators.

Using BC Hydro's network of dams to firm or shape intermittent renewable power generated in British Columbia is smart policy. If the goal is to sell into the export market, it then makes economic sense to ensure that the BC electrons are firm and nicely shaped, and would command premium prices. In addition, BC firmed and shaped electrons become that much more valuable and have significant advantage over jurisdictions which use coal or natural gas to shape power from intermittent sources. Bottom line - you simply cannot expect to have strong domestic wind, run-of-river or solar energy industries in British Columbia without the complementary storage capacity.

So, after years of speculation, we now know that Site C will finally proceed to the permitting stage. There is much work yet to be done, but if successful, the massive storage capacity of Site C and BC's heritage dam system will provide valuable battery-like capability to the great benefit of the Province's renewable energy industry and to the Province as a whole. With the existing heritage dams and eventually Site C, BC is well positioned to harness the power and maximize economic value from its clean energy natural resources.

BC's 2010 Throne Speech - Untapping BC's Clean Energy Potential

Today, the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia delivered the Speech from the Throne (click to read), which opened the Second Session of the 39th Parliament of British Columbia.  

The 2010 Olympics and the economy were principal topics of course, but the BC government's commitment to revamping the Province's clean energy industry also featured prominently. Below are some of the highlights from the Speech relevant to the clean energy sector:

  • The BC government will take a fresh look at B.C.'s regulatory regimes, including the BC Utilities Commission.
  • BC can harness [BC's untapped energy] potential to generate new wealth and new jobs in its communities while it lower greenhouse gas emissions within and beyond our borders.
  • Clean energy is a cornerstone of BC's Climate Action Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by one‑third by 2020.
  • Building on the contributions of the Green Energy Advisory Task Force, the BC government will launch a comprehensive strategy to put BC at the forefront of clean energy development.
  • BC has enormous potential in bioenergy, run‑of‑river, wind, geothermal, tidal, wave and solar energy. We will put it to work for our economy.
  • The BC government will introduce a new Clean Energy Act to encourage new investments in independent power production while also strengthening BC Hydro.
    • It will provide for fair, predictable, clean power calls.
    • It will feature simplified procurement protocols and new measures to encourage investment and the jobs that flow with it.
  • New investment partnerships in infrastructure that encourage and enable clean modes of transportation, such as electric vehicles, hydrogen‑powered vehicles and vehicles powered by compressed natural gas and liquid natural gas, will be pursued.
  • The BC government will support new jobs and private sector investment in wood pellet plants, cellulosic ethanol production, biomass gasification technologies and fuel cell technologies.
  • Bioenergy creates new uses for waste wood and beetle‑killed forests and new jobs for forest workers.
  • A new receiving license will give bioenergy producers new certainty of fiber supply, while a new stand‑as‑a‑whole pricing system will encourage utilization of logging residues and low‑grade material that was previously burned or left on the forest floor.
  • The BC government will optimize existing generation facilities and report on the Site C review this spring.
    • It will develop and capture B.C.'s unique capability to firm and shape the intermittent power supply that characterizes new sources of clean energy to deliver reliable, competitively‑priced, clean power — where and when it is needed most.
  • New conservation measures, smart meters and in‑home displays will help maximize energy savings. New smart grid investments and net metering will provide more choices and opportunities for reduced energy costs and more productive use of electricity.
  • New transmission investments will open up the Highway 37 corridor to new mines and clean power.
  • New transmission infrastructure will link Northeastern B.C. to our integrated grid, provide clean power to the energy industry and open up new capacity for clean power exports to Alberta, Saskatchewan and south of the border.
  • We will seek major transmission upgrades with utilities in California and elsewhere.
  • If the Province act with clear vision and concerted effort now, in 2030, people will look back to this decade as we look to the 1960s today.

With significant investment in green energy being made elsewhere, both in Canada and the US,  we hope that today's Speech from the Throne demonstrates the BC government's commitment to building the Provincial economy in part with the support of the clean energy sector.

BC's Green Energy Advisory Task Force

Following up on the BC Government's August 2009 throne speech and the Premier's announcement on November 2, 2009, today, the BC Government announced the members of, and the terms of reference for, BC's Green Energy Advisory Task Force. 

 
Here is the weblink for public submissions, which can be made on any of the four task force topics until December 31.
 
I am very pleased to have been appointed to be a part of a team that will advance BC's long-term vision for green energy.
 
Reporting directly to the Cabinet Committee on Climate Action and Clean Energy, the Green Energy Advisory Task Force will comprise of the following 4 advisory task force groups:
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Procurement and Regulatory Reform
    This task force will recommend improvements to BC Hydro’s procurement and regulatory regimes to enhance clarity, certainty and competitiveness in promoting clean and cost-effective power generation; and identify possible improvements to future clean power calls and procurement processes.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Carbon Pricing, Trading and Export Market Development
    This task force will develop recommendations to advance British Columbia’s interests in any future national or international cap and trade system, and to maximize the value of B.C.’s green-energy attributes in all power generated and distributed within and beyond B.C. borders. The task force will also develop recommendations on carbon-pricing policies and how to integrate these policies with any cap and trade system developed for B.C.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Community Engagement and First Nations Partnerships
    This task force will develop recommendations to ensure that First Nations and communities see clear benefits from the development of clean and renewable electricity and have a clear opportunity for input in project development in their areas. It will work in partnership with First Nations, not only to respect their constitutional right, but to open up new opportunities for job creation and reflect the best practices in environmental protection.
  • Green Energy Advisory Task Force on Resource Development
    This task force will identify impediments to and best practices for planning and permitting new clean, renewable-electricity generation to ensure that development happens in an environmentally sustainable way. The task force will also consider allocation of forest fibre to support energy development and invite input from solar, tidal, wave and other clean energy sectors to develop strategies to enhance their competitiveness.
BC has tremendous green energy potential and we are pleased that the government is taking steps that will help turn British Columbia's energy potential into real economic, environmental and social benefits for all British Columbians.

Clean Power Call, Port Electrification and Ontario's First Nations Green Energy Funding

Clean Power Call Update
 
On August 24, BC Hydro provided an update to its Clean Power Call. According to the update, BC Hydro will now call on the proponents to assess the status of their consultations with First Nations to date, effectively delaying the EPA awards under the Clean Power Call. The decision to review First Nations consultation stems from the two decisions made by the BC Court of Appeal last February in the Carrier Sekani Tribal Council v. B.C. (Utilities Commission) and Kwikwetlem First Nation v. British Columbia (Utilities Commission). Additional information on this new requirement will be posted on BC Hydro's Clean Power Call website as it becomes available. Also in the update, BC Hydro "anticipates that any EPA awards will occur in the Fall of 2009", which is a welcomed hint of certainty to the renewable energy industry and the billions of investment dollars waiting for the results of the Clean Power Call.
 
Port of Vancouver Goes Electric
 
It was announced this week that the Port of Vancouver is now able to provide direct electricity hook-ups to cruise ships, making it only one of three ports in the world (Juneau and Seattle) with such capability. Now when a cruise ship docks in the Port of Vancouver, instead of running the diesel engines for power, it be able to plug into the BC electricity grid, which is supplied for the most part by renewable energy. This is great news in the battle to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (it will reduce GHG emissions by 39,000 tons annually) and certainly a boost to the renewable energy industry in the Province. It is also another step towards making Vancouver one of the world's greenest cities. Kudos to the partnership between the federal and provincial governments, Holland America Line, Princess Cruises, BC Hydro and the Port of Vancouver.
 
Ontario's New First Nations and Renewable Energy Programs
 
The Ontario Government announced today that is launching two new programs for First Nations and Metis communities interested in developing and owning renewable energy facilities, such as wind, solar and hydroelectric projects. Under the $250 million Aboriginal Loan Guarantee Program, Aboriginal communities will be eligible for loan guarantees from the Ontario Government to assist with equity participation in renewable energy generation and transmission projects. The Aboriginal Energy Partnerships Program is designed to build capacity and participation by providing funds for community energy plans, feasibility studies, technical research and developing business cases and create an "Aboriginal Renewable Energy Network". Ontario is showing tremendous leadership in the area of green energy these days, and these two new Aboriginal programs will certainly be welcomed by the renewable energy industry as a means to facilitate more Aboriginal participation in green energy projects, which is a good thing.

 

BC Throne Speech - A Major Boost For Green Energy

Today, the Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia delivered the Speech from the Throne (click to read) to open the 2009 Legislative Session: 1st Session, 39th Parliament of the BC Legislature.

For BC's renewable energy sector which has been looking for a new commitment from the BC Government, the Throne Speech was most definitely that.

Here are the specific renewable energy highlights direct from the Speech: 

·         Green energy will be a cornerstone of British Columbia's climate action plan.

·         Electricity self-sufficiency and clean, renewable power generation will be integral to our effort to fight global warming.

·         The BC Utilities Commission will receive specific direction.

·         Phasing out Burrard Thermal is a critical component of B.C.'s greenhouse gas reduction strategy.

·         Further, this government will capitalize on the world's desire and need for clean energy, for the benefit of all British Columbians.

·         Whether it is the development of Site C, run-of-river hydro power, wind, tidal, solar, geothermal, or bioenergy and biomassBritish Columbia will take every step necessary to become a clean energy powerhouse, as indicated in the BC Energy Plan.

·         Government will use the means at its disposal to maximize our province's potential for the good of our workers, our communities, our province and the planet.

·         While these forms of power require greater investment, in the long run, they will produce exponentially higher economic returns to our province, environmental benefits to our planet and jobs throughout British Columbia.

·         High-quality, reliable, clean power is an enormous economic advantage that will benefit every British Columbian in every part of this province for generations to come.

·         Ready access to clean, affordable power has been a huge strategic incentive to industrial development in British Columbia.

·         We will build on past successes with new strategies aimed at developing new clean, renewable power as a competitive advantage to stimulate new investment, industry and employment.

·         Growing knowledge industries like database management and telecommunications will increasingly look for new places to invest and create jobs that have clean, reliable, low-carbon, low-cost power.

·         New energy producers will be looking for long-term investments leveraged through long-term power contracts that give them a competitive edge in our province.

·         B.C.'s multiple sources of clean, renewable energy are far preferable to reliance on other dirtier forms of power.

·         We will open up that power potential with new vigour, new prescribed clean power calls and new investments in transmission. New approaches to power generation, transmission and taxation policies will create new high-paying jobs for British Columbia's families.

·         A new Green Energy Advisory Task Force will shortly be appointed to complement the work of the BCUC's long-term transmission requirement review.

·         That task force will be asked to recommend a blueprint for maximizing British Columbia's clean power potential, including a principled, economically-viable and environmentally-sustainable export development policy.

·         It will review the policies, incentives and impediments currently affecting B.C.'s green power potential, and it will identify best practices employed in other leading jurisdictions.

·         We will promote biomass power solutions and convert landfill waste into clean energy that reduces harmful methane gas emissions.

·         The government has mandated methane capture from landfills to ensure we deal responsibly with our own waste and convert it to clean energy where practicable.

Update: BCUC Section 5 Transmission Inquiry

Following up from our earlier blog post on the Section 5 Transmission Inquiry, after almost four months of workshops and procedural conferences, the BCUC continues to narrow the scope of the issues for the Inquiry. Stakeholder consultation is on-going and the two principal utility participants are holding workshops and inviting comments from participants on specific issues (BC Hydro on resource option potential and BCTC on its scenario development process and the export study) before September 18 when the first draft "evidence" is submitted by BC Hydro and BCTC.

Two weeks ago, after an uncomfortably long but ultimately productive oral hearing on the scope of issues for the Inquiry, the BCUC released its preliminary determinations on the scope and scale for the next steps in the long-term analysis of the transmission system. The issues addressed in the BCUC's July 10 letter on preliminary determinations focused mainly on the following issues

  • provincial generation potential
  • domestic electricity demand
  • interjurisdictional trade (import and export of electricity)
  • analysis of the transmission system
  • areas inappropriate for development
  • integration of generation, demand and transmission requirement
As you can see, the issues are very broad and the analysis at a very high-level.
 
Yesterday, over 200 participants attended a BC Hydro workshop in Vancouver on the Province's renewable energy resource option potentialBC Hydro's presentation included a series of renewable energy resource maps of the Province showing potential sites for run-of-river, large hydro and pumped storage, wind, geothermal, biomass, solar and, wave and tidal. BC Hydro also provided detailed maps on so-called "exclusion areas" (ie, legal no build zones) and potential regional power clusters. I found the maps to to be very very interesting, albeit not particularly site specific. If you interested in where the renewable energy potential is in British Columbia you have to check out these maps (I am told the materials will be available on the BC Hydro site sometime soon).  BC Hydro has asked that stakeholders provide it with confidential comments on BC Hydro's version of the Province's resource option potential by August 14. Stakeholders may also submit their own comments directly to the BCUC through the Inquiry process. 
 
There is also a significant First Nations element to the Inquiry. The first issue which the BCUC is addressing in this regard, is the duty to consult and accommodate First Nations in the context of the Inquiry. I won't at this time get into the complex legal issues on the subject, but a further procedural conference on First Nations issues is scheduled at the BCUC on August 18 and 19, 2009 and written submissions are now being made.

With over 105 registered participants, the Section 5 Transmission Inquiry is certainly one of the most followed hearings ever before the BCUC, and one of the more interesting, especially with respect to the future development of renewable energy resources in this Province.

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Free Money: Canada's Clean Energy Fund Program

So you would like some free money for your clean energy project demonstration? The Government of Canada through its recently announced Clean Energy Fund Program is now offering $850 million over five years for the demonstration of promising technologies, including large-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects, and renewable energy and clean energy systems demonstration. An additional $150 million over 5 years is available for clean energy research and development.
 
You can read more about the Clean Energy Fund Program here and here, and the Request for Proposals (RFP) for funding.
 
For renewable and clean energy project demonstrations, $200 million of free Canadian dollars is available to those who meet certain eligibility criteria and have full project proposals submitted no later than end of business on September 14, 2009.  Note that the first step is to file with the federal government an "Intent to Submit Project Proposal".
 
Technologies eligible for funding include, but are not limited to, the following:
  • Smart Grids
  • Plug-in Hybrid electric charging infrastructure
  • efficient systems which facilitate intermittent renewable power and heat
  • utility scale storage systems
  • heat pump with natural refrigerants and supply of renewable energy
  • efficient hybrid systems combining renewable or waste energy with limited fossil fuel input for remote communities
  • geothermal or waste heat sources upgraded for power and and heat for communities
  • wind energy technologies that address Canadian challenges (ie cold climate, remote communities, offshore application and grid integration)
  • marine energy
  • low head hydro
  • solar thermal and PV systems

The good news is that the Government of Canada has again recognized the importance of renewables and the need to meet the diverse demands of the country. The bad news is that there is a lot more money being diverted to cleaning up the pollution, rather than replacing the pollutters altogether.

Integrating Variable Electricity Generation into the Grid

The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), the international regulatory authority for electric reliability of the bulk power system in North America, yesterday released a special report entitled "Accommodating High Levels of Variable Generation", which calls for changes to the way the North American bulk power system is planned and operated.  For a quick read, here is a copy of the executive summary

The NERC special report was drafted by a committee of some 50 industry experts, including grid operators, utilities, wind and solar manufacturers, trade associations and government authorities across North America. Some of the report’s specific recommendations include:

  • Planning practices and methods require change — The integration of high levels of variable generation will require system planners to change planning practices, procedures, methods, and tools to ensure reliability in the coming years. Incorporating resources located at the distribution-level (such as roof-top solar panels and “smart grid” technologies) into bulk power system planning studies is a key area in need of improvement, along with integrated analysis of transmission and resources in probabilistic planning studies.
  • Grid operators require new tools and practices — Ensuring the efficient, effective, and reliable use of variable resources will require a number of changes in system operations centers, including incorporating consistent and accurate forecasting of daily and seasonal variable generation output and advanced control techniques into daily and real-time practices. A comprehensive regional analysis of the operational impacts of proposed system changes (i.e., larger balancing areas or participation in wider-area balancing management) is also recommended.
  • Industry encouraged to pursue research and development and establish appropriate market signals — A renewed focus on research and development for new system models, continued improvement of variable generation technologies, and advanced planning techniques is needed. The report also recommends that organized markets consider instituting mechanisms designed to ensure the availability of adequate flexible balancing resources. Appropriate requirements for generation ramping requirements, minimum generation levels, and shorter operations scheduling intervals should also be considered.
  • Policy makers encouraged to remove barriers to transmission development and consider reliability — The report encourages policy makers to accelerate transmission siting, approve permits for needed facilities, and otherwise remove barriers to needed transmission development. It also encourages policy makers to consider the opportunities and issues associated with proposed system changes, the importance of coordinated planning, and the impacts of variable generation on wide-area system reliability.

In the context of the BCUC's Section 5 Inquiry on BC's long term electricity transmission requirements, this report comes at a most appropriate time.  There is no doubt that intermittent, or variable, electricity poses a challenge connecting to BC's heritage electricity grid, so it is critical that these issues are considered, at a precisely the time when more and more electrons from renewable power, like wind and solar, are seeking access to the grid.  

The BC Energy Plan: Report on Progress

Last week, the BC Government released a report on progress of its 2007 BC Energy Plan.  The report shows just how far the Province has come in a little over 2 years since the introduction of the BC Energy Plan and demonstrates the Province's environmental leadership and many initiatives in the clean energy sector.

Some of the renewable energy specific highlights in the report include:

The Province should be properly recognized for doing many of the right things to encourage the development of a green economy on many different fronts throughout British Columbia. While there is much work still to be done, the foundation has been laid and businesses have stepped up and invested millions of dollars, and created thousands of jobs as a result of the Energy Plan. So, yes, a green focused economy works very well for British Columbia.

Meanwhile...South of the Border: Introducing The American Clean Energy and Security Act

President Obama promised a commitment to green energy, and today, the United States Committee on Energy and Commerce delivered, through the introduction of new federal clean energy legislation that, according to the press release, "will create millions of clean energy jobs, put America on the path to energy independence, and cut global warming pollution."  

The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACESA) is still in the draft stage, but it certainly looks promising, and I must admit to a bit of envy of our American friends and their progressive legislators.  Here is the Discussion Draft Summary (click to download) which is definitely worth reading (all I can say is wow!).  The New York Times' Green Inc. blog weighs in on the reaction to the controversial legislation.

The ACESA will focus on four principle areas:

  1. Clean Energy: which includes renewable energy load requirements at 6% in 2012 and a whopping 25% in 2025, carbon capture and sequestration, clean fuels and vehicles, smart grid and electricity transmission.
  2. Energy Efficiency: which includes new building and appliance standards, energy rebates, new fuel and emissions standards, and national energy efficiency standards.
  3. Reducing Global Warming Pollution: which includes a market-based program of "allowances" and "offsets" for electric utilities, oil companies, large industrial sources and other entities (looks alot like cap and trade), steps to preventing international deforestation and the introduction of additional greenhouse gas standards.
  4. Transitioning to a Clean Energy Economy: which includes measures to ensure domestic competitiveness in the form of rebates for companies which produce commodities that are traded globally, the promotion of green jobs, consumer assistance, export of clean tech and a high level response to global warming.

In Canada, we can't even begin to compare our green energy legislation to the Americans, there is definitely nothing like the proposed ACESA, which is definitely too bad, but perhaps also a goal for our country's leaders.  For some recent Canadian context, the federal government has just invested $140M with the major oil companies for carbon-capture projects (ugh!). In addition, the feds have not renewed the very successful (and green economy stimulating) Canadian ecoENERGY for Renewable Power program

In all, it remain to be seen what will become of the surely to be ACESA, but judging by the broad reach of the proposed legislation, the Obama Administration means business when it comes to the green economy. One thing is abundantly clear - the United States sees clean energy, energy efficiency and fighting climate change as part of the new world order and critical to the future of America. This leadership is something Canadians should recognize and the smart ones will harness the momentum from south of the border and work to create our own carbon-reduced green energy economy.  The green energy technology revolution:  you can't stop it, you can only hope to contain it.

Facts on Independent Power Production in British Columbia

Yesterday, the British Columbia Government, Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum Resources, issued a press release entitled "Facts on Independent Power Production" (click to download a copy), to correct misleading claims about electricity generation in the Province. It's a must read for anyone who is interested in green energy in British Columbia.  

The comprehensive press release deals with many of the falsehoods being spread by opponents to independent power producers and specifically addresses, with facts, the following topics: 

  • What it means to BC to be "electricity self-sufficient"
  • BC Hydro's on-going role in the BC Energy Plan
  • Costs to ratepayers for long-term IPP energy purchase contracts
  • The non-privatization of BC Hydro
  • Local input and environmental review of IPP projects
  • BC rivers remaining in the public's control
  • The possible future export of power by IPP's
  • The export/import debate
  • The number of current water power applications and what these mean
  • The total number of IPP's operating in BC and the investment they have brought
  • First Nations support of IPP projects

This release is very good timing given the current political climate and the unfourtunate, mostly politically motivated, backlash against the IPP industry. Hopefully, the facts will help educate the public about IPP's and we can then move to a proper dialogue on how we as a Province can use our incredible natural endowment to reduce our greenhouse gas emissions and reverse the damaging effects of climate change.  To do anything short of that would be a disgrace.

BC's February 2009 Throne Speech - The Green Energy Agenda

For our report on the August 26, 2009 Throne Speech (A Major Boost to Green Energy), click here.

The BC Government today delivered its Throne Speech, outlining its political agenda for the upcoming year, and you can't help but notice that an election is coming on May 12, 2009. 

It was no surprise, but energy was among the major topics addressed on in the speech calling it "another core competitive advantage for British Columbia".  The Government sees a green energy economy as a catalyst to creating rural jobs, reducing greenhouse gases and transforming forestry in the Province.  Apparently, green energy is central to the future economic success of our Province. Can't really disagree with that.

Below are some of the more interesting energy related quotes (see pages 21-27 of the Throne Speech): 

  • "Our government will build on its Clean Energy Plan with new direction to BC Hydro and to the British Columbia Utilities Commission."
  • "Independent power production will continue to create new jobs in rural communities."
  • "We will open up new opportunities for private investment to create jobs and meet our needs."
  • "We can become global leaders in wind, run-of river, tidal, geothermal, wave, solar and other forms of clean, renewable power and leading-edge transmission technologies."
  • "An integrated, expanded transmission plan that encourages small scale power projects, economic opportunity and jobs throughout B.C. will be set by year end."
  • "Energy opportunities will transform the future of forestry in British Columbia with clean, carbon-neutral bioenergy, fueled by biomass from beetle-killed forests."
  • "Our government will pursue a major expansion in transmission capacity that will create thousands of new construction jobs and reduce energy loss through transmission."
  • "The goal of a Northeast Transmission Line will be pursued."
  • "More work will be done this year to advance the dialogue on Site C to decide its merit."

It only gets more interesting from here. Tomorrow is budget day.

 

 

 

 

 

WWSHD? - What will Stephen Harper Do?

Stephen Harper’s Conservative government will be introducing the earliest budget ever on January 27, 2009. Aside from the obvious political reasons for the budget being introduced at this time, there is no question that the need for fiscal stimulus is becoming stronger every day. The government has been consulting with various groups and stakeholders as well as the provinces in anticipation of tabling the budget in 11 days.

One of the main things to remember is that the current crisis facing the world is double barrelled and involves both the economy and the environment.  However, addressing these crises does not require mutually exclusive solutions. The feds should concentrate on putting money into ensuring that a post-financial crisis Canadian economy is a green economy. I can’t say it any better than Peter Robinson, CEO of the David Suziki Foundation in a piece published today in the Toronto Star:

With a few bold moves, a green stimulus package could turn Canada into a global renewable energy powerhouse. We're talking tens of thousands of new jobs in things like turbine manufacturing, home retrofits, solar panel installation, wind farm construction and transit-line building. These are skilled, made-in-Canada jobs that feed families, build wealth and help communities grow and prosper.

This point is exactly right, and Peter Robinson isn’t the only one to have made it recently. In a pre-budget submission to Finance Minister Jim Flaherty, the Canadian Solar Industries Association (“CanSIA”) appealed to the Finance Minister to make “a more aggressive commitment to the deployment of renewable energy” and to “establish the renewable energy sector as a pillar of the nation’s new economic stimulus strategy”. In particular, CanSIA mentioned that the U.S. is expected to experience a solar boom as a result of the “supportive policies and programs that are currently in place or being developed" by Barack Obama and the incoming White House Administration and urged Minister Flaherty to act now to take advantage of favourable forecasts by RBC Capital Markets and Merril Lynch regarding the future of the clean technology and renewable energy fields. 

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Coming Soon: Solar Power Grid Parity

I'm a big fan of solar power. I like the idea of a solar panel on every rooftop. It just makes too much sense not to do it - eventually. You see, the challenge to this idea is the current cost of energy from solar power which was estimated in 2007 to be between $700 and $1,700 per mWh (compared to $43 to $62 per mWh for large-hydro).  So, in using current solar technology available and without significant subsidies, solar powering the grid is far too expensive to be feasible in Canada.  In Germany however, where it is certainly not any sunnier than much of Canada, solar power has been very successful for two main reasons, a generous feed-in tariff program and a general willingness by Germans to pay higher costs for energy from renewable sources, like solar. 

That is why it was interesting to see an article in the Toronto Star recently reporting that grid parity  in Canada for solar power could come very soon. The Canadian Solar Industries Association Solar Conference 2008 held last week in Toronto, was told by Navigant Consulting that utility-scale solar photovoltaic projects could reach "grid parity" without subsidies between 2020 and 2023 if fossil fuel prices increase as expected and if, under an emissions trading regime, carbon dioxide is priced at $70 per tonne. I admit those are two very very big "if's".

Since we can't count on $200+ oil and the world community agreeing on a suitable price for carbon anytime soon, government subsidies are badly needed to further develop the solar power industry in Canada. Perhaps this is a job for Green Bonds, as we previously blogged about on Megawatt, which could provide the base for a public incentive program.  With advancements in solar panel technology and increasing demand around the world for renewable power there is a real opportunity here. It's just a matter of finding the leadership to do it.